Deep-sea temperature and circulation changes at the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum.

Tripati, A. K. and Elderfield, H. (2005) Deep-sea temperature and circulation changes at the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum. Science, 308. pp. 1894-1898. DOI 10.1126/science.1109202

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Abstract

A rapid increase in greenhouse gas levels is thought to have fueled global warming at the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM). Foraminiferal magnesium/calcium ratios indicate that bottom waters warmed by 4° to 5°C, similar to tropical and subtropical surface ocean waters, implying no amplification of warming in high-latitude regions of deep-water formation under ice-free conditions. Intermediate waters warmed before the carbon isotope excursion, in association with downwelling in the North Pacific and reduced Southern Ocean convection, supporting changing circulation as the trigger for methane hydrate release. A switch to deep convection in the North Pacific at the PETM onset could have amplified and sustained warming.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: 2005 AREP IA48 2005 P
Subjects: 01 - Climate Change and Earth-Ocean Atmosphere Systems
Divisions: 01 - Climate Change and Earth-Ocean Atmosphere Systems
Journal or Publication Title: Science
Volume: 308
Page Range: pp. 1894-1898
Identification Number: 10.1126/science.1109202
Depositing User: Sarah Humbert
Date Deposited: 16 Aug 2010 12:47
Last Modified: 23 Jul 2013 09:59
URI: http://eprints.esc.cam.ac.uk/id/eprint/1851

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