Rapid onset of mafic magmatism facilitated by volcanic edifice collapse: MAFIC MAGMATISM FACILITATED BY VOLCANIC EDIFICE COLLAPSE

Cassidy, M. and Watt, S. F. L. and Talling, P. J. and Palmer, M. R. and Edmonds, M. and Jutzeler, M. and Wall-Palmer, D. and Manga, M. and Coussens, M. and Gernon, T. and Taylor, R. N. and Michalik, A. and Inglis, E. and Breitkreuz, C. and Le Friant, A. and Ishizuka, O. and Boudon, G. and McCanta, M. C. and Adachi, T. and Hornbach, M. J. and Colas, S. L. and Endo, D. and Fujinawa, A. and Kataoka, K. S. and Maeno, F. and Tamura, Y. and Wang, F. (2015) Rapid onset of mafic magmatism facilitated by volcanic edifice collapse: MAFIC MAGMATISM FACILITATED BY VOLCANIC EDIFICE COLLAPSE. Geophysical Research Letters, 42 (12). pp. 4778-4785. ISSN 0094–8276 DOI 10.1002/2015GL064519

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Official URL: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015GL064519

Abstract

Volcanic edifice collapses generate some of Earth's largest landslides. How such unloading affects the magma storage systems is important for both hazard assessment and for determining long-term controls on volcano growth and decay. Here we present a detailed stratigraphic and petrological analyses of volcanic landslide and eruption deposits offshore Montserrat, in a subduction zone setting, sampled during Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 340. A large (6–10 km3) collapse of the Soufrière Hills Volcano at ~130 ka was followed by explosive basaltic volcanism and the formation of a new basaltic volcanic center, the South Soufrière Hills, estimated to have initiated <100 years after collapse. This basaltic volcanism was a sharp departure from the andesitic volcanism that characterized Soufrière Hills' activity before the collapse. Mineral-melt thermobarometry demonstrates that the basaltic magma's transit through the crust was rapid and from midcrustal depths. We suggest that this rapid ascent was promoted by unloading following collapse.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: 2015AREP; IA69; weekly list
Subjects: 05 - Petrology - Igneous, Metamorphic and Volcanic Studies
Divisions: 05 - Petrology - Igneous, Metamorphic and Volcanic Studies
07 - Gold Open Access
Journal or Publication Title: Geophysical Research Letters
Volume: 42
Page Range: pp. 4778-4785
Identification Number: 10.1002/2015GL064519
Depositing User: Sarah Humbert
Date Deposited: 23 Dec 2015 16:15
Last Modified: 23 Dec 2015 16:15
URI: http://eprints.esc.cam.ac.uk/id/eprint/3526

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